Intersectionality explained

This paper shared as one of the resources was found by Vicky Ward https://kmbresearcher.wordpress.com/, who was at the Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum, http://www.knowledgemobilization.net/event/2017-canadian-knowledge-mobilization-forum/

 

PUT SIMPLY: According to an intersectionality perspective, inequities are never the result of single, distinct factors. Rather, they are the outcome of intersections of different social locations, power relations and experiences.

paper by  Olena Hankivsky, PhD of https://www.sfu.ca/iirp/ 

see the paper here: https://www.sfu.ca/iirp/documents/resources/101_Final.pdf

Charles Jennings shares his thoughts on “the myth of knowledge transfer”

 Spotted by Stephen Downes http://www.downes.ca/,  Charles Jennings shares his thoughts on “the myth of knowledge transfer”

spaced_practice

During a meeting at Cambridge University around 30 years ago I was thoroughly chastised by a Cambridge academic.

I’d used the phrase ‘learning delivery’ when describing computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) approaches. CSCL was one of the hot pedagogical approaches of the day – when network-based learning was in its relative infancy.

“Charles, my dear fellow”, said the Cambridge man, “we may deliver milk, but learning is something that is acquired, never delivered”.

Of course he was right. I’d been sloppy with language. What I’d meant by ‘learning delivery’ was ‘providing the resources and environments that help learning and, by inference, improved performance, to occur’. Learning takes place in our heads. We alone make it happen.

I guess the phrase I’d used was a shorthand. However, it was the last time I ever used it. It conveyed an inaccurate message.

see the article herehttp://charles-jennings.blogspot.ca/2017/05/the-knowledge-and-learning-transfer.html


… Exposure to other organisations’ experiences can also be very useful for our own organisation’s learning and development, but no two organisations are exactly the same. If we package up the acquired data, information and practices in one organisation it’s extremely unlikely that they can be simply unpacked and used as-is with the same effect in another, no matter how closely aligned the organisations might be. The ‘knowledge transfer’ model doesn’t even work between organisations in industries with relatively standardised process . What works for Mercedes is unlikely to work for Ford without quite a bit of thought and customisation.  …

Parliamentary E-petition 959, which calls for national pharmacare during this federal government’s mandate

Circulated Petition –

From: “Morgan, Steve” <steve.morgan@ubc.ca>

I am writing to ask you to consider signing and sharing Parliamentary E-petition 959, which calls for national pharmacare during this federal government’s mandate. As you know, pharmacare in Canada can and should be a public drug plan that is universal, comprehensive, evidence-based, and sustainable.

This is not my petition, but it is important to get behind it. That is because the federal government might interpret a lack of signatures as a lack of public interest — even though national polling data and the Citizens’ Reference Panel on Pharmacare in Canada show that a vast majority of Canadians support universal pharmacare!

As published in the Toronto Star today, here are my four main reasons why pharmacare is important enough to act on. Please feel free to share this widely.

  1. Access to essential medicines is a human right

The most important reason for universal pharmacare in Canada is that access to essential medicines is actually a human right according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO recommends that countries protect that right in law and with pharmaceutical policies that work in conjunction with their broader systems of universal health coverage. Consistent with this, every other high-income country with a universal health care system provides universal coverage of prescription drugs. It is time Canada did the same.

  1. Universal pharmacare would save lives

Canada’s patchwork of private and public drug plans leaves millions of Canadians without coverage. As a result, Canadians are three to five times more likely to skip prescriptions because of cost than are residents of comparable countries with universal pharmacare programs. A 2012 study estimated that inequities in drug coverage for working-age Ontarians with diabetes were associated with 5,000 deaths between 2002 and 2008. Nationally, this human toll would be equivalent to a major aviation disaster happening several times per year.

  1. Universal pharmacare would save money

Canadians spend 50 percent more per capita on pharmaceuticals than residents of the United Kingdom, Sweden, New Zealand and several other countries with universal pharmacare programs. This amounts to spending $12 billion more each year and still not having universal drug coverage. Why? Because the universal pharmacare programs in other countries use their purchasing power to obtain better drug prices than our fractured system. Among many examples of such price differences, a year’s supply of atorvastatin, a widely used cholesterol drug, costs about $143 in Canada but only $27 in the United Kingdom and Sweden, and under $15 in New Zealand.

  1. Universal pharmacare would help Canadian businesses

The rising cost of pharmaceuticals are a growing burden on Canadian businesses. Part of the problem is that Canadian employers waste between $3 billion and $5 billion per year because employment-related private insurance is ill equipped to manage pharmaceutical costs effectively. Another part of the problem is that the number of prescription drugs costing more than $10,000 per year has grown almost ten-fold in the past decade. Because such costs can quickly render a work-related health plan unsustainable — particularly for small businesses — it is best to manage them at a province- or nation-wide basis.

Nevertheless, universal pharmacare will not happen unless citizens speak up

Billions of dollars in savings to Canadian taxpayers, employers and households equals billions of dollars of lost revenues to pharmaceutical industry stakeholders. Those stakeholders will not make it easy for government to implement universal pharmacare, no matter the benefit to Canadians and the broader economy.

To make pharmacare a reality for Canada, citizens need to get informed and involved. If they support the idea of universal, public pharmacare, they need to let others, particularly elected officials and political candidates, know they care and that they will support a government that takes action.

So, please, take the time to sign Parliamentary E-petition 959 and to share this with your colleagues, friends, and family.

Thank you!

Respectfully yours,

Steve Morgan PhD

Professor | Faculty of Medicine | School of Population and Public Health

The University of British Columbia | Vancouver Campus

Email: steve.morgan@ubc.ca | Web: www.pharmacare2020.ca  |  Twitter: @SteveUBC

“Every other developed country with a universal health care system provides universal coverage of prescription drugs … so should Canada!”

Ontario Budget 2017: ISAC response and analysis

More than 930,000 Ontarians continue to wait for incomes that give health and dignity: Other announcements bring much-needed change

Ontario’s 2017 Budget does very little to address the deep poverty experienced by people relying on support from Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), particularly those without other sources of income.

The Budget does make meaningful and substantial change to OW and ODSP rules around asset and gift exemptions, and significant increases to allowances for people in remote northern communities, all of which are welcome improvements.

As well, the Budget reiterates government’s commitment to income security reform, signalling the importance of the upcoming report from the Income Security Reform Working Group.

The Budget’s signature program announcement, prescription drug coverage for all Ontarians aged 24 years and under, makes major progress on expanding drug coverage beyond seniors and those receiving social assistance.

And while advocates are looking forward to comprehensive change to Ontario’s labour laws in the upcoming Changing Workplaces Review report, no new investments have yet been made in employment standards enforcement.

more follow below

Source: Ontario Budget 2017: ISAC response and analysis

SWAG spotlights new avenues of research by Marjorie Silverman on carers and caregiving

SWAG wind up until Fall meeting, from Beverlee McIntosh – “Please RSVP so we know how many are coming!! Its always a nice evening of networking, socializing and education. PLEASE join us!”

THURSDAY MAY 11TH 6:30 to 9 PM
[SWAG] SOCIAL WORK IN AGING AND GERONTOLOGY
ANNUAL EVENING PRESENTATION

RSVP to beverlee.mcintosh@gmail.com

Theme: Spotlight on new avenues of Research on Carers and Caregiving

Marjorie Silverman

Speaker: Marjorie Silverman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor,
School of Social Work, University of Ottawa

The projects examine the everyday life experiences of carers, one from the perspective of young adults caring for older adults, and the other from the perspective of carers of people with dementia. The greater part of the presentation will focus on the experiences of carers of people with dementia in their neighbourhoods and communities. While there is growing interest in the topic of ‘dementia-friendly’ communities, there has been little Canadian research to date. What are carers’ social, relational, and practical experiences of their neighbourhoods? How are they being supported locally? Where do they go and why? Professor Silverman will talk about the innovative methods she is using to try to answer these questions. She will also share some preliminary findings, in particular as they relate to the topic of walks and the multiple purposes of local walks for carers.

SOCIAL WORK IN AGING AND GERONTOLOGY [SWAG]

ANNUAL SOIRÉE HOSTED BY COLONEL BY RETIREMENT HOME

THURSDAY MAY 11TH

Hors D’eouvres   6:30 -Talk will start shortly after 7PM

Article – Going beyond ‘context matters’: A lens to bridge knowledge and policy

While this article from INTEGRATION AND IMPLEMENTATION INSIGHTS is more relevant to EDs, it does have value for front line workers as we attempt to have a grip and work to understand our organization’s and the broader government and social institutions efforts to bridge research to practice. 

… context-matters_echt

  1. the macro-contextual approach, which has dominated the existing (though limited) literature on context, focuses largely on factors that are usually beyond the sphere of control or influence of those trying to promote the use of knowledge in policy (such as the extent of political freedom, media freedom, etc). In contrast, our intention was to strategically identify potential areas of change for different types of interventions.
  2. we believe that governmental institutions constitute the most direct environment where practices to promote the use of knowledge in policy take place. They are the setting where most decisions about policies are discussed and, most importantly, where they are implemented.
  3. the role of institutions in enabling systemic change has also been widely recognized in development-related projects. Focusing at the institutional level has promising potential to contribute to change because of the significant role borne by institutions within any system  …

See the article here: Going beyond ‘context matters’: A lens to bridge knowledge and policy

Community Social Enterprise, building the evidence of benefits for recovery, wellness and citizenship

See this CMAJ article “Action on the social determinants of health through social enterprise”

Figure

Recent attention to the role that social entrepreneurship could play in addressing acute health care challenges1 reminds us that addressing the socioenvironmental factors that influence the physical, mental, social and spiritual components of health and well-being2 requires similarly innovative and imaginative responses. Social enterprises are a potentially useful and economically viable strategy to this end. These are organizations that engage in commercial trade for a social purpose — most often to address one or more aspects of social vulnerability — rather than for the personal financial enrichment of owners or shareholders.  …

please see the articlehttp://www.cmaj.ca/content/189/11/E440.short?rss=1

by 1. Michael J. Roy, PhD Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK; Rosemary Lysaght, PhD, and Terry M. Krupa, PhD  School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont.