Category: Community Development

Basic Income, a Critical Ingredient for Social Enterprise

CASW, shared this article.

A new study from the Mowat Centre in Toronto suggests that a basic income program could encourage people to take the leap and start their own socially conscious businesses.

The study involved surveying and interviewing members of the Centre for Social Innovation, which has sites in Toronto. It indicated that a basic income could give a leg up to people with a bright idea but limited resources to get it off the ground.

“Given our research, we think that a basic income could de-risk social entrepreneurship for people. We think that it could encourage more people from marginalized communities to try social entrepreneurship as a career,” said Michael Crawford Urban, a policy associate at the Mowat Centre and co-author of the report. …

See the rest of the article:http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/social-entrepreneurs-basic-income-1.4131886

See the MOWAT Centre report herehttps://mowatcentre.ca/basic-impact/

Guide on strengthening our everyday agency partnerships

Our knowledge base and purpose as social workers focus’ on micro, mezo, macro levels even if it is not named in our job descriptions. A key ingredient in practice is supporting clients and our programs to be effective, relevant. This resource, shared by Community Workspace on Homelessness  https://workspaceonhomelessness.ca/can help us address the mezo in our practice.

 

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View the See Yourself as a Partner: Guide to Community Partnership Development elaborated collaboratively the University of Ottawa, a working group of community participants and with the HPS.  The guide is a how-to on addressing homelessness through partnerships. It includes key considerations, questions, checklists templates and other tools to create, maintain and evaluate community partnerships.

see the guide here: https://workspaceonhomelessness.ca/…/see_yourself_as_a_part…

Film on the music and stories by those who live on the streets of Toronto

From the Wrench and the Alliance to End Homelessness

April 5, 2017 7:00 PM

arts court, 2 Daly Street

LOWDOWN TRACKS: Wednesday, at Arts Court Theatre , Ottawa
Carleton Cinema Politica is proud to present, in association with the Alliance to End Homelessness Ottawa and The Wrench, the award-winning film Lowdown Tracks on April 5th, 2017.
Inspired by depression-era folk songs, filmmaker Shelley Saywell and singer and activist Lorraine Segato set out to document the music and stories of those who live on the margins of society and bare their souls through their songs on the streets of Toronto. They have created Lowdown Tracks, an acclaimed documentary film, celebrating the music and stories of those living on the margins.
Voted top Canadian Audience Choice award at Hot Docs in 2015! 
As our homeless crisis grows, life on the margins threatens more and more people. The causes, from abuse to mental health to simple bad luck, are all touched on in the film. At its heart, Lowdown Tracks is about bringing into focus the heartache and the beautiful potential we should see when we walk by someone on the street. In the end, it is a celebration of the power of music and survival.
“Lowdown Tracks is so important because it injects hope, purpose and creates a sense of urgency to the work we’re doing and rallies people to take action. And action is the name of the game. The 20,000 Homes campaign is a catalyst for action. Lowdown Tracks is the spark.” – Tim Richter (President & CEO Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness & 20,000 Homes Campaign)
Lowdown Tracks dir. Shelley Saywell | Canada | 2015 | 86 mins
Pay-What-You-Can | donations are welcome | CDs will be available for purchase Lowdown Tracks is co-presented by the Alliance to End Homelessness Ottawa

Book focus’ on housing, citizenship and community life for people living with serious mental illness

From CRECS enewsletter

CRECS invites you to the launch of a new book:  Housing, Citizenship, and Communities for People with Serious Mental Illness: Theory, Research and Policy Perspectives.

Edited by John Sylvestre, Geoffrey Nelson, and Tim Aubry.

Housing, Citizenship, and Communities for People with Serious Mental Illness provides the first comprehensive overview of the field. The book covers theory, research, practice, and policy issues related to the provision of housing and the supports that people rely on to get and keep their housing. A special focus is given to issues of citizenship and community life as key outcomes for people with serious mental illness who live in community housing. The book is grounded in the values, research traditions, and conceptual tools of community psychology. This provides a unique lens through which to view the field. It emphasizes housing not only as a component of community mental health systems but also as an instrument for promoting citizenship, social inclusion, social justice, and the empowerment of marginalized people. It serves as a resource for researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers looking for up-to-date reviews and perspectives on this field, as well as a sourcebook for current and future research and practice trends.

March 8, 2017. 3:30 pm to 5:30 PM
Alex Trebek Alumni Hall
– 155 Séraphin-Marion Private
RSVP here.

book info: http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190265601.001.0001/acprof-9780190265601

Social Innovation and enterprise as ways to address social problems

Colloquium: From the Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services (CRECS)

The Evaluation of Social Innovation and Social Enterprise

Findings from a Systematic Review and Integration of the Empirical Knowledge Base

Social innovation (SI) and enterprise (SE) have gained prominence as novel ways to address social problems. Evaluators have been experimenting with how to approach SI and SE. We report on a systematic review of empirical studies of SI and SE evaluations to describe the approaches used, their drivers and effects.
Peter Milley, Assistant Professor. Faculty of Education; Barbara Szijarto, Doctoral Candidate. Faculty of Education; Kate Svensson, Doctoral Candidate. Faculty of Education; Dr. J. Bradley Cousins, Professor Emeritus. Faculty of Education.

January 20, 2017. 120 University, Room 5028. Light lunch will be served. Register here.

CRECS Colloquium -Evaluation of Social Innovation and Social Enterprise

The Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services (CRECS) http://crecs.uottawa.ca/ , shared this event

Social innovation (SI) and enterprise (SE) have gained prominence as novel ways to address social problems. Evaluators have been experimenting with how to approach SI and SE. We report on a systematic review of empirical studies of SI and SE evaluations to describe the approaches used, their drivers and effects.
CRECS noon-hour Colloquium
Friday, 20 January 2017 – 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm

Location

Contact information

Contact person:
Alejandro Gomez
Email:
crecs@uottawa.ca
Phone:
6135625800
Extension:
1856

Registration

Registration required:
Yes
Registration details:

Free. Light lunch will be served.

Cost to attend:
Free of charge
Event language:

(Presentaion in English)

Social innovation (SI) and enterprise (SE) have gained prominence as novel ways to address social problems. Evaluators have been experimenting with how to approach SI and SE. We report on a systematic review of empirical studies of SI and SE evaluations to describe the approaches used, their drivers and effects.

  • Peter Milley, Assistant Professor. Faculty of Education
  • Dr. J. Bradley Cousins,  Professor Emeritus. Faculty of Education
  • Barbara Szijarto, Doctoral Candidate. Faculty of Education
  • Kate Svensson, Doctoral Candidate. Faculty of Education

Webnair – literature review on Collaborative Leadership in Practice

From the Ontario Public Health Association and Health Nexus

On December 8th 12:00 to 1:00pm, join us as OPHA and Health Nexus release a literature review on Intersectionality, Anti-Oppression and Collaborative Leadership in Practice. This review contains materials and resources that can assist individuals and organizations in developing and sustaining equitable, anti-oppressive, collaborative leadership frameworks to support inclusive partnerships and networks. The literature review synthesizes and analyzes a wide range of research and non research materials in order to provide greater clarity on inclusive, equitable and collaborative leadership in the non-profit sector.