Category: Practice skills

Webinar – Families, Clients and PHIPA (health information sharing) in Mental Health

Webinar -Useful and indepth, grounded in actual practice – with case examples.

… “It was clear that both caregivers and providers could benefit from a resource that would set the record straight about how Ontario’s privacy and consent rules apply to them. In this report, The Change Foundation set out to address these concerns …”

See the site with background documents…/

 See the webinar


Learn more about the Ontario Patient Ombudsman via their in depth annual report

The 2016/17 Annual Report and website of the Ontario Patient Ombudsman who is mandated to: 

 … champion for fairness in Ontario’s health sector organizations defined as public hospitals, long-term care homes and home and community care services coordinated by the Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs, formerly CCACs).

It would be useful to hear from practitioners/clients their local experience here in Ottawa as this new initiative has great potential to contribute to care change/improvements.


Ontario Patient Ombudsman

…we are asking patients and caregivers to continue to be fearless in bringing their complaints to our office and for health sector organizations to be fearless in working with us to help improve Ontario’s healthcare system.

See the report here:

Eastern OASW newsletter– theme on cultural diversity

Many of The Bulletin’s articles for this theme of focus are written by individuals grounded in practice.

Culturally sensitive and culturally responsive social work = Inclusive holistic diverse approaches to service. Our Fall Bulletin explores diverse approaches to serving refugee communities, African and Caribbean clients with mental health issues, and developing creative and collaborative measures for multicultural seniors and our First Nations people. …


Go to and click on “About OASW” and “Branches”

“E-referral” and the development of two way communication between programs/agencies in “Champlain”

From Jaime Constable, Senior Project Advisor, Champlain Community Support Network,  Thanks to SWAG for sharing.  I find their efforts interesting by encouraging a two way exchange of information.  Also I am curious on how 211, Information and Referral fits into this.

Description: Champlain Community Support Network

Making your services open to the public on Caredove

Referrals between agencies and from other sectors into community support services have been steadily increasing. Caredove also enables access by community members directly. Clients and caregivers can search for services and set up their own intake appointments. Some agencies have felt ready to open their services on Caredove for public access, and are asking how.

You are welcome to make your services open for public access, and share the Caredove site with your community members.

Here’s how to make services accessible:
1. Ensure that ‘sign ups’ are enable for all your services listed on Caredove
2. To get there, click on the ‘Settings’ tab in Caredove
3. Select ‘Referral Settings’ from the drop down menu
4. In the Service table at the bottom of the page, ensure that ‘Sign ups Enabled’ is set to ‘Yes’ for each service as appropriate.

Help get the word out to our partners

We want to ensure that our health care partners know more about community support services, and about how easy it is to refer their patients on Caredove. We are offering ongoing webinar introductions to the initiative, and helping other organizations sign up for accounts. Please help us get the word out about these opportunities by sharing the flyer linked below with your contacts in other sectors.

Training for health care partners in other sectors
E-referral to community support services in Champlain 

Tuesday, Dec 12 2017
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

This webinar provides an introduction of the Champlain e-referral to community support services initiative for our partners in other health care sectors. Please share the attached flyer with your contacts in other sectors.

Access the flyer here

Registration open: Champlain E-referral Webinars

Training for Community Support Services Staff
Introduction to Caredove Webinar

Wednesday, Jan 17th, 2017
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

This webinar is an excellent opportunity for new staff or existing staff who have not yet received Caredove training. Topics covered: Searching for services, sending referrals, the Calendar and Referral inbox features.

Register Now
E-referral Community of Practice Meeting

The Community of Practice sessions are designed to take a deeper look at referral processes and emerging changes in practice related to e-referral across the sector. They are also an opportunity to learn about more advanced special functions of Caredove.

We invite you to share any tips or successes from your experience using e-referral. If you are interested in presenting, or if there are special topics you would like to see covered, please e-mail your feedback to Jaime Constable at

Date: Fri Jan 12 2017
Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Register now 



Jaime Constable
Senior Project Advisor
Champlain Community Support Network
Direct: 613-714-9454

Narratives of Social Workers involvement in social control in mental health yet wrestling with “the system”

This article provides a view of how the British mental health system framed social work practice under their mental health law. 


The paper explores the notion of ‘dirty work’ in relation to the newly created role of the Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP). An AMHP undertakes various duties set out in the 1983 Mental Health Act, as amended by the 2007 Act, in relation to assessments to make applications for compulsory admission to psychiatric hospital. It has been argued that undertaking this social control function is ‘dirty work’. However, the findings from a study of social work AMHPs in England suggest that the picture is more complex. Extracts from narrative interviews are analysed using dialogical narrative analysis. Rather than being designated as dirty work, AMHP duty was presented as prestigious and as advanced social work. However, through their storytelling, the social workers clearly delineated the aspects of AMHP work that they did designate as dirty, specifically the lack of beds, the complexities of co-ordination and the emotional labour which is an inherent part of the work.

The British Journal of Social Work, Volume 46, Issue 3, 1 April 2016, Pages 703–718,
Published: 26 February 2015

Our Clinical Documentation activities…. client centred principles for the future of electronic health records

This document by Canada Health Infoway  is relevant to future directions and to keep in mind as each of us types up our: progress notes, our treatment plans, our assessments, our various forms of the day. Relevant to how we, our managers our VP’s and more importantly our clients and their networks of support; be more closely grounded, better still participate in our daily activities of documentation.


One of the most striking results of this workshop is that although the theme was digital health technology, much of the conversations over the day and a half revolved around relationships and communication. In fact, most of the priorities laid out in the Citizens’ Vision touch on these themes: creating an environment that encourages clinicians to share in decision-making with patients; creating the conditions for patients to take an active role in their care; connecting different parts of the health system to enable better flows of information. This seemed to resonate the most with participants – the promise that digital solutions might help to bridge the gaps between patients, providers, and institutions.


See the Document here

Final Report on Legal Capacity, Decision-making and Guardianship from Ontario’s Law Reform Commission

After years of work in developing the report, the Law Commission of Ontario’s final report with suggestions on implementation.…ng-and-guardianship/

These laws have a profound impact on the wellbeing of the individuals addressing both the protection of the autonomy of affected individuals and the risks of abuse and exploitation of individuals who may be vulnerable.

This project responds to public concerns regarding:

  • Misuse of powers of attorney;
  • Inappropriate interventions in lives of elderly Ontarians and Ontarians with disabilities;
  • Complex, lengthy and costly resolution of legal disputes;
  • Widespread lack of understanding among individuals, families, health and legal professionals, institutions, community agencies, and others; and,
  • Need to update Ontario’s laws in light of significant impact of demographic, legal, and social changes since these laws were introduced.

The LCO’s report is the most comprehensive analysis of Ontario’s framework governing legal capacity, decision-making and guardianship laws in nearly 30 years. Ontario’s current legislative regime for legal capacity, decision-making and guardianship took shape following several provincial reports in the late 1980s – early 1990s.