Category: Social media knowledge sharing aka “The medium is the message”

Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice

From four United States social work bodies that partnered with  the National Association of Social Workers to develop the standards –  NA S W, A S W B, C S W E , & C S WA.  Note that the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) includes Canadian regulatory bodies.

photo from: “Much research on information and communication technology and society” byRichard Smith is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Technology Standards in Social Work Practice (2017)

… The following standards
are divided into four main sections and address
social workers’ use of electronic technology to
(1) provide information to the public; (2) design
and deliver services; (3) gather, manage, store,
and access information about clients; and (4)
educate and supervise social workers. These
standards are designed to guide social workers’
use of technology; enhance social workers’
awareness of their ethical responsibilities when
using technology; and inform social workers,
employers, and the public about practice standards
pertaining to social workers’ use of technology. …

See the document: at the USA’s, National Association of Social Workers website:

https://www.socialworkers.org/includes/newIncludes/homepage/PRA-BRO-33617.TechStandards_FINAL_POSTING.pdf

It looks quite extensive, it would be useful to see how other countries are approaching use of Information Communication Technology as the relevance of the www, to a community’s context’s, human interactions, only grows each day. 

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“respect, accomplishment, achievement” – for action, learning, knowledge sharing with ICT

A re-post from Stephen Downes’ enewsletter, http://www.downes.ca/ , sorry, I can’t find his reference, from the reference.  I found listening to this talk useful as the panel is discussing use of ICT amongst – thinking, our individual character, and I dare say, the sociological context.

 

 

Presentation itself is from: https://oeb.global/programme

 

Organizing social action via the Internet vs. the need to actually TALK

I have to get off the internet, to read this article by Nadine Moawad ! 

It’s the end of an era for online activism. We have
lost our safe, small, intimate spaces of digital
publishing to corporate giants, state-run troll
armies, and idiotic online commentary. In this
piece, I will offer 8 points of advice to feminists
and queers organizing in digital spaces.

https://itforchange.net/e-vaw/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Opinion-piece-1.pdf

Image result for free images of the internet

Charles Jennings shares his thoughts on “the myth of knowledge transfer”

 Spotted by Stephen Downes http://www.downes.ca/,  Charles Jennings shares his thoughts on “the myth of knowledge transfer”

spaced_practice

During a meeting at Cambridge University around 30 years ago I was thoroughly chastised by a Cambridge academic.

I’d used the phrase ‘learning delivery’ when describing computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) approaches. CSCL was one of the hot pedagogical approaches of the day – when network-based learning was in its relative infancy.

“Charles, my dear fellow”, said the Cambridge man, “we may deliver milk, but learning is something that is acquired, never delivered”.

Of course he was right. I’d been sloppy with language. What I’d meant by ‘learning delivery’ was ‘providing the resources and environments that help learning and, by inference, improved performance, to occur’. Learning takes place in our heads. We alone make it happen.

I guess the phrase I’d used was a shorthand. However, it was the last time I ever used it. It conveyed an inaccurate message.

see the article herehttp://charles-jennings.blogspot.ca/2017/05/the-knowledge-and-learning-transfer.html


… Exposure to other organisations’ experiences can also be very useful for our own organisation’s learning and development, but no two organisations are exactly the same. If we package up the acquired data, information and practices in one organisation it’s extremely unlikely that they can be simply unpacked and used as-is with the same effect in another, no matter how closely aligned the organisations might be. The ‘knowledge transfer’ model doesn’t even work between organisations in industries with relatively standardised process . What works for Mercedes is unlikely to work for Ford without quite a bit of thought and customisation.  …

“Internet health as a social issue”

CBC’s SPARK, explores how the internet is now part of our… ecology , making me think we need to add it to our efforts to advance the social determinants of health for the people we work with.

“The internet is so critical to human life and the economy and society right now, that its impact is as significant as the environment,”

It may seem strange to think of the “health” of the internet.

But what if we started thinking about caring for the internet, collectively, in order for it to keep working properly?

“The health of the internet is something that we think needs to be a mainstream social issue just like the environment or education.”

Mark Surman is the Executive Director of the Mozilla Foundation, the non-profit dedicated to an open internet.

352 Mark Surman

Mark Surman (Mozilla)

Mark likens it to the time just before the environmental movement began to take hold:

See the article here: http://www.cbc.ca/radio/spark/…cial-issue-1.4053202

 

Digital life and death

I stumbled on this approach/resource via a tweet from social work tech group.   Both the tech and pod cast sites seem like a lively spot to support knowledge sharing for social workers.

Death and Grief in the Digital Age: Interview with Carla Sofka, Ph.D.

[Episode 109] Today’s episode of the Social Work Podcast is about Death and Grief in the Digital Age. I spoke with Dr. Carla Sofka, professor of Social Work at Siena College. Dr. Sofka has been studying and writing about the intersection of technology and death and grief since the earliest days of the world wide web. Her edited 2012 text, Dying, Death and Grief in an Online Universe, looks at how changes in communication technology have revolutionized the field of thanatology.

In today’s episode we talk about the role of social media in how, why, where and when, who we grieve. She shares stories of people whose loved ones have died, only to find out that because of social media they are the last to know. Carla provides some digital literacy around death and grief in the digital age. She talks about social media posts as death notifications, about establishing digital advance directives and thinking about our digital dust.

She talks about STUG reactions which are Sudden Temporary Upsurges of Grief. I had never heard of a STUG reaction, but I actually had one during our conversation. You’ll hear me talk about college friend of mine who died several years ago and during the interview start to tear up as I recalled getting a Facebook notification that it was her birthday.  We then talked about internet ghosts, memorial pages, memorial trolls, how and when people should respond to death notices online and what that means for the loved ones. She suggests that just as we provide sex education to kids, we should be providing death education.  She also recommends including technology assessment in the standard biopsychosocialspiritual assessment. We ended our conversation talking about resources for mental health professionals who want to learn more.



The Social Work Podcast

Provides information on all things social work, including direct practice (both clinical and community organizing), research, policy, education… and everything in between.

http://socialworkpodcast.blogspot.ca/


Social Work Tech 

Social Work Tech

Mission
These articles are intended to help practitioners, psychotherapists, students, and visionaries in social work (and related fields) to understand technology tools and utilize them so that one can be better organized, improve delivery of intervention, and promote personal and professional development.
Vision
To empower personal and professional development of helping professionals through the use of technology.

http://socialworktech.com/