Category: Social Work in Research and Evaluation

Some tools to help us think about implementing evidence in our practice

Health Evidence www.healthevidence.org shares tools that guide practice evidence, developed in collaboration with local public health organizations.  While targeted at public health some of the tools provide useful approaches for emerging front line projects.

File:Garden tools.jpg

photo by: SpitfireTally-ho! / Spitfire at en.wikipedia

Looking for tools to help you find and use research evidence? Use the Health Evidence™ practice tools to help you work through the evidence-informed decision making process; search for evidence, track your search, and share lessons learned with your public health organization.

Example of tools:

See the current tools at their site herehttp://www.healthevidence.org/practice-tools.aspx

Architecture to keep track of the big picture of health learning and the ensuing interventions

From the journal of Implementation Science, https://implementationscience.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13012-017-0607-7

…In this paper, we propose the use of architectural frameworks to develop LHSs that adhere to a recognized vision while being adapted to their specific organizational context. Architectural frameworks are high-level descriptions of an organization as a system; they capture the structure of its main components at varied levels, the interrelationships among these components, and the principles that guide their evolution.

Intersectionality explained

This paper shared as one of the resources was found by Vicky Ward https://kmbresearcher.wordpress.com/, who was at the Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum, http://www.knowledgemobilization.net/event/2017-canadian-knowledge-mobilization-forum/

 

PUT SIMPLY: According to an intersectionality perspective, inequities are never the result of single, distinct factors. Rather, they are the outcome of intersections of different social locations, power relations and experiences.

paper by  Olena Hankivsky, PhD of https://www.sfu.ca/iirp/ 

see the paper here: https://www.sfu.ca/iirp/documents/resources/101_Final.pdf

Charles Jennings shares his thoughts on “the myth of knowledge transfer”

 Spotted by Stephen Downes http://www.downes.ca/,  Charles Jennings shares his thoughts on “the myth of knowledge transfer”

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During a meeting at Cambridge University around 30 years ago I was thoroughly chastised by a Cambridge academic.

I’d used the phrase ‘learning delivery’ when describing computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) approaches. CSCL was one of the hot pedagogical approaches of the day – when network-based learning was in its relative infancy.

“Charles, my dear fellow”, said the Cambridge man, “we may deliver milk, but learning is something that is acquired, never delivered”.

Of course he was right. I’d been sloppy with language. What I’d meant by ‘learning delivery’ was ‘providing the resources and environments that help learning and, by inference, improved performance, to occur’. Learning takes place in our heads. We alone make it happen.

I guess the phrase I’d used was a shorthand. However, it was the last time I ever used it. It conveyed an inaccurate message.

see the article herehttp://charles-jennings.blogspot.ca/2017/05/the-knowledge-and-learning-transfer.html


… Exposure to other organisations’ experiences can also be very useful for our own organisation’s learning and development, but no two organisations are exactly the same. If we package up the acquired data, information and practices in one organisation it’s extremely unlikely that they can be simply unpacked and used as-is with the same effect in another, no matter how closely aligned the organisations might be. The ‘knowledge transfer’ model doesn’t even work between organisations in industries with relatively standardised process . What works for Mercedes is unlikely to work for Ford without quite a bit of thought and customisation.  …

Article – Going beyond ‘context matters’: A lens to bridge knowledge and policy

While this article from INTEGRATION AND IMPLEMENTATION INSIGHTS is more relevant to EDs, it does have value for front line workers as we attempt to have a grip and work to understand our organization’s and the broader government and social institutions efforts to bridge research to practice. 

… context-matters_echt

  1. the macro-contextual approach, which has dominated the existing (though limited) literature on context, focuses largely on factors that are usually beyond the sphere of control or influence of those trying to promote the use of knowledge in policy (such as the extent of political freedom, media freedom, etc). In contrast, our intention was to strategically identify potential areas of change for different types of interventions.
  2. we believe that governmental institutions constitute the most direct environment where practices to promote the use of knowledge in policy take place. They are the setting where most decisions about policies are discussed and, most importantly, where they are implemented.
  3. the role of institutions in enabling systemic change has also been widely recognized in development-related projects. Focusing at the institutional level has promising potential to contribute to change because of the significant role borne by institutions within any system  …

See the article here: Going beyond ‘context matters’: A lens to bridge knowledge and policy

Theory of change for an elder abuse program, CRECS Colloquium

For both front line workers and program evaluators there is value to bridge our practice and evaluation.   This presentation promises to help us integrate as well as guide the complexity of practitioner practice knowledge with organizational and program mission.

Colloquium: From the Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services (CRECS)

Representing well a case-management theory of change for an elder abuse program– implications for construct validity
Much attention is being given to using program theory as the foundation for making valid inferences in evaluation. However, case management programs offer unique challenges to valid representation. This research proposes a model for representing program theory validly in a case management program, the Elder Abuse Prevention and Response Services.

France Gagnon, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Education.

Friday March 10 – learn more here: http://www.uocal.uottawa.ca/en/node/17403
Registration details: Free. Light lunch will be served. Registration website:
Cost to attend: Free of charge