Category: Governance and Decision Making

Policy Partnerships within government itself, ingredients for “buy-in”

The Centre for Urban Studies via http://stmichaelshospitalresearch.ca/research-programs/urban-health-solutions/our-projects/building-healthy-policy-and-practices/increasing-collaboration-within-governments-to-improve-population-health-and-equity/  supports linking of policy to practice. One example of their efforts focus’ specifically on policy development within government itself, providing this paper below.  

Using Win-Win Strategies to Implement Health in All Policies: A Cross-Case Analysishttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0147003

  • Agnes Molnar,
  • Emilie Renahy,
  • Patricia O’Campo,
  • Carles Muntaner,
  • Alix Freiler,
  • Ketan Shankardass

…Findings

Our results yielded no support for the use of awareness-raising or directive strategies as standalone approaches for engaging partners to implement HiAP. However, we found strong evidence that mechanisms related to “win-win” strategies facilitated implementation by increasing perceived acceptability (or buy-in) and feasibility of HiAP implementation across sectors. Win-win strategies were facilitated by mechanisms related to several activities, including: the development of a shared language to facilitate communication between actors from different sectors; integrating health into other policy agendas (eg., sustainability) and use of dual outcomes to appeal to the interests of diverse policy sectors; use of scientific evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of HiAP; and using health impact assessment to make policy coordination for public health outcomes more feasible and to give credibility to policies being developed by diverse policy sectors. …

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Architecture to keep track of the big picture of health learning and the ensuing interventions

From the journal of Implementation Science, https://implementationscience.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13012-017-0607-7

…In this paper, we propose the use of architectural frameworks to develop LHSs that adhere to a recognized vision while being adapted to their specific organizational context. Architectural frameworks are high-level descriptions of an organization as a system; they capture the structure of its main components at varied levels, the interrelationships among these components, and the principles that guide their evolution.