Category: Uncategorized

Our Clinical Documentation activities…. client centred principles for the future of electronic health records

This document by Canada Health Infoway https://www.infoway-inforoute.ca/en/  is relevant to future directions and to keep in mind as each of us types up our: progress notes, our treatment plans, our assessments, our various forms of the day. Relevant to how we, our managers our VP’s and more importantly our clients and their networks of support; be more closely grounded, better still participate in our daily activities of documentation.

TECHNOLOGY AS A TOOL FOR ENABLING RELATIONSHIPS

One of the most striking results of this workshop is that although the theme was digital health technology, much of the conversations over the day and a half revolved around relationships and communication. In fact, most of the priorities laid out in the Citizens’ Vision touch on these themes: creating an environment that encourages clinicians to share in decision-making with patients; creating the conditions for patients to take an active role in their care; connecting different parts of the health system to enable better flows of information. This seemed to resonate the most with participants – the promise that digital solutions might help to bridge the gaps between patients, providers, and institutions.

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See the Document herehttps://www.infoway-inforoute.ca/en/component/edocman/resources/reports/3326-better-health-together-workshop-the-citizens-vision-for-better-health-through-digital-solutions?Itemid=101

Call for a “renewed” national agency to address social infrastructure

Michael Mendelson of the recently closing Caledon Institute  http://www.caledoninst.org/ lays out a vision of a new agency to build upon the history of councils working on social welfare.

…Today the National Council of Welfare is gone. The Canadian
Council on Social Development barely exists, limping along with little
national presence. These two core national agencies, which provided a
prominent voice for ‘social Canada,’ are no longer heard. At the same
time, many other national groups that were important to social policy
have also disappeared, such as the Economic Council of Canada. As of
November 2017, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy, to which this author
is affiliated and which has been critical in developing many practical
social policy innovations over the last two and a half decades (most notably
the child benefit system introduced by the new Trudeau government),
will also close up shop.

WHAT WE NEED NOW
For Canada to remain a nation that aspires to protect our most
vulnerable citizens while providing equal opportunity for all, we cannot
stand still in the face of the challenges to come. We must evolve and
adapt our social security and development systems to the reality of the
world around us. This is not a task for government alone. Business,
labor, media, religious and Indigenous organizations and many others in
both our economic life and our civil society must play a role.

What Canada is missing is an ‘institutional’ national agency,
which can bring together the many and varied elements of civil society,
government and others towards continuously assessing, improving and
adapting our nation’s social infrastructure to ever-changing circumstances.
But neither the National Council of Welfare nor the Canadian Council
on Social Development as they were established would be suitable for
today’s needs. …

See the proposal here: http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1116ENG.pdf?utm_source=Announcement&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Announcement1351

Social Workers need to step directly into guiding the organizations we work within

Lynn Sherwood’s article in Eastern OASW Summer Bulletin helps us step back, consider how we can say out loud “…the Emperor has no clothes.”  She outlines the context for the individual worker within the organization and… the context of the organization in the system of care.  

Image from: https://wiki.scn.sap.com/wiki/display/BOBJ/Dashboards+%28Xcelsius%29+General+Best+Practices

…It wasn’t supposed to be like this. The profession of social work began back at the turn of the twentieth century as a response to poverty and to the terrible living conditions of new immigrants to Canada. The agencies and organizations we work for have never been affluent, and we have never represented much more than a finger in the dyke, holding back the rising tides of human misery. This knowledge goes with the territory. Our focus on the relationship between individuals and their social environment, on advocacy for social change, has always been fundamental to our profession. However, in recent years ostensibly laudable expectations of efficiency, effectiveness, accountability, measurable outcomes, have devolved into an uncomfortable acceptance of “The Business Model” of providing social services, leaving us struggling to function in impossible, contradictory situations. …

See the article here https://www.oasw.org/Public/About_OASW/Eastern_Branch.aspx  (scroll down to the newsletters, open then go to page 20)

Some tools to help us think about implementing evidence in our practice

Health Evidence www.healthevidence.org shares tools that guide practice evidence, developed in collaboration with local public health organizations.  While targeted at public health some of the tools provide useful approaches for emerging front line projects.

File:Garden tools.jpg

photo by: SpitfireTally-ho! / Spitfire at en.wikipedia

Looking for tools to help you find and use research evidence? Use the Health Evidence™ practice tools to help you work through the evidence-informed decision making process; search for evidence, track your search, and share lessons learned with your public health organization.

Example of tools:

See the current tools at their site herehttp://www.healthevidence.org/practice-tools.aspx

Survey “Hospital Discharge for Patients Experiencing Homelessness.”

From the  Community Workspace on Homelessness – “an interactive space for communities and by communities!”

Profile image for Canadian Observatory on Homelessness.

If you are a professional whose work relates to homelessness, please consider completing this anonymous 3-minute survey titled, “Hospital Discharge for Patients Experiencing Homelessness.” This research is being conducted by Dr. Kristy Buccieri, Assistant Professor at Trent University, to better understand professional opinions on discharge planning for patients experiencing homelessness. For further information, please contact kristybuccieri@trentu.ca.

https://workspaceonhomelessnes…ke_this_short_survey

Architecture to keep track of the big picture of health learning and the ensuing interventions

From the journal of Implementation Science, https://implementationscience.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13012-017-0607-7

…In this paper, we propose the use of architectural frameworks to develop LHSs that adhere to a recognized vision while being adapted to their specific organizational context. Architectural frameworks are high-level descriptions of an organization as a system; they capture the structure of its main components at varied levels, the interrelationships among these components, and the principles that guide their evolution.